The king lists of Herodotus

Herodotus traveled Asia and northern Africa, his second volume of Histories describes Egypt’s geography, people and relates stories about a number of pharaohs.

Herodotus was born about 490 BC in Halicarnassos and died in Italy in the late 420s. While many of his stories might only be myths, they contains many names of the pharaohs. As a chronology it is almost worthless. For instance, he placed the pyramid builders of the Old Kingdom after the New Kingdom. Some of the named pharaohs are clearly compounded from more than one pharaoh. The end result is, in most cases, unreliable and hold very little historic credibility. Many of the known names of the pharaohs trace their origin to Herodotus.

After Mina came three hundred and thirty kings, whose names the priests recited from a papyrus roll. In all these many generations there were eighteen Ethiopian kings, and one queen, native to the country; the rest were all Egyptian men.

Herodotus, book II, chapter 100.1
ChapterGreekTransliterationPharaoh
2.99.2ΜιναMinaNarmer
2.100.2ΝιτωκριςNitokrisNetjerikara
2.101.1ΜοιριοςMoeriusAmenemhat III
2.102.1ΣεσωστριςSesostrisSenusret III
2.111.1ΦερωνPheron?
2.112.1ΠρωτεαProteus?
2.121.1PαμψινιτονRhampsinitosRamesses III
2.124ΧεοπαKheopsKhufu
2.127ΧεφρηναKhephrenKhafra
2.129ΜυκερινονMycerinusMenkaura
2.136.1AσυχινAsukhis?
2.137ΣαβακωνSabakonShabaka
2.137AνυσινAnusis?
2.140.2AμυρταιουAmurtaiouAmyrtaeus
2.141.1ΣεθωνSethosShebitko
2.151.2ΨαμμητιχοςPsammetikhosPsamtik I
2.152.1ΝεκωνNeconNecho I
2.158.1ΝεκωςNecosNecho II
2.159.3ΨαμμιPsammiPsamtik II
2.161AπριηςApriesApries
2.172AμασιςAmasisAmasis

Bibliography